There’s No Place Like Hope Event

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There’s No Place Like Hope Event

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Friday, November 4th, 2016, the Samaritan House co-hosted an event with Levine Cancer Institute at Levine’s Museum of the New South. The food was great and drinks were enjoyed by everyone as well as the fantastic museum exhibits. Board President Rod Wilkes engaged the audience by introducing what the mission of Samaritan House is and how valuable every contribution can be to serving our guests. A video of one of our past and most beloved guests was shown to explain that Samaritan House really is a place of healing and opportunity for those individuals and patients in unfortunate circumstances. Ruth and Frita, our founding members, gave a sentimental speech about how their first offices were in a train station and how much Samaritan House has grown for the better. Another moving narrative was made by Brad Goforth “the fat guy” who is always around, who keeps Samaritan House operational by doing enough work for 5 people every single day, along with our 3 other staff members. We thank Dr. Raghavan, an oncologist and the president of Levine Cancer Institute for making this night possible and for teaming up with us to continue to provide a safe haven for homeless cancer patients. We particularly thank Ashley Sumrall and all of our board members for putting this event together. The donations and generosity were more than we could ever expect.

 

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unknownWe have been given a special challenge! The Leon Levine Foundation has offered a matching grant of up to $20,000 as a match in donations. This is a dollar for dollar match for all new, increased and lapsed donations we receive now until November 30th, 2016! All funds will go towards helping our cancer patients achieve remission or other positive outcomes from their cancer treatments.

So far, the  new program for our cancer patients has been a growing success. Our first guest had her lung cancer go into total remission and a second guest is in the final stages of her treatment plan and is having very positive results! For this reason we ask your help, to be able to prove that the Samaritan House is an effective means toward healing members of our homeless population, including those who have the most serious of illness-cancer.

Any new gift, renewal of giving, or increase in giving can help us achieve our goals with this grant. It all helps us meet the challenge of caring for these seriously ill people who otherwise face premature death. If interested in donating, you may do so through our website, mail or by stopping by the house and dropping it off. Together, we can achieve some great things for our community.

Click below to access our direct donation link!

http://samaritanhousecharlotte.org/donations/

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Friday, November 4th at 5:30 pm at Levine Museum of the New South

A Message from our hosts-

Dear Friends,

As the fall season rapidly descends upon us, there is little doubt your calendars are filling up just as quickly. Today, we write to ask you to make room for an altruistic and incredibly important fundraiser to help those in the most desperate of situations – specifically the homeless in our community who are fighting cancer and are on chemotherapy and/or radiation treatments.

Since 2005, the Samaritan House has graciously and expertly provided temporary respite and recuperative care to Mecklenburg County’s homeless men and women in need following a hospital stay or emergency room visit. Operating on a shoe-string budget and living largely hand-to-mouth, Samaritan House offers healing hope to medically vulnerable individuals most often displaced through loss of employment or marginalized due to other mitigating life circumstances. Greater than 80% of Samaritan House guests achieve recovery with return to permanent housing, a true testament to the organization’s success and dedication.

In recent years, the organization has generously accepted the risk of caring for the patients from Levine Cancer Institute who are homeless and undergoing complex and often lengthy cancer treatments. This courageous act has placed increased burden on the facility as patients stay longer, require increased transportation and additional supportive management services not previously required. Of importance, most of the unfortunate people in this setting have been displaced from their homes through economic circumstances, bankruptcies, loss of employment and other very unhappy circumstances.
If not for the Samaritan House opening its doors and rooms to our patients, the alternative of recovering from treatment side effects like nausea and fatigue without the benefit of a bed or even protection from the elements is unconscionable.

Thus, we, our staff and our colleagues have taken on the task of helping the Samaritan House achieve financial stability and possible future expansion so they may continue their critical mission of providing priceless care to those in greatest need.

We invite you to join us on this imperative endeavor. After all, there really is no place like hope.

Kindest regards,

Rod Wilkes, President, Board of Directors at Samaritan House
Derek Raghavan MD PhD, President, Levine Cancer Institute/Carolinas HealthCare System
Ashley Sumrall, MD, Head, Medical Neuro-Oncology, Levine Cancer Institute
Mellisa Wheeler, MHA, Senior Social Worker & Outreach Coordinator, Levine Cancer Institute.

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More information on the tax legislation.

1. Yesterday, the U.S. House of Representatives approved the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R. 1), its tax reform plan. The House plan includes a number of provisions that would harm nonprofits, most notably:
a. It would severely weaken the Johnson Amendment, which protects the public's trust in nonprofits by keeping partisan politics out of 501(c)(3) organizations. Section 5201 of the H.R. 1 would give all 501(c)(3) nonprofits a partial (and vaguely worded) exemption from the prohibition on partisan political intervention. The provision would allow nonprofits to endorse candidate for office "as long as the speech is in the ordinary course of the organization's business and the organization's expenses related to such speech are de minimis." This major change to Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code would be effective from 2019 through 2023. This provision, which would divert money from nonprofits' missions into partisan politics. It would damage the public's trust in nonprofits by transforming 501(c)(3) organizations into Democratic nonprofits and Republican nonprofits, and it would divert billions of dollars in political campaign spending to newly politicized churches and nonprofits.
b. By nearly doubling the standard deduction, the House tax plan would reduce charitable giving by between $12 billion and $20 billion per year, since only about 5% of Americans would itemize their taxes - down from about 30% who currently use itemized deductions.
c. H.R. 1 would eliminate all tax-exempt private activity bonds, including qualified 501(c)(3) bonds. A variety of nonprofits, including schools, hospitals, museums, and affordable housing organizations, use these bonds to finance building and renovation projects.
d. The House plan would double the exemption from the estate tax (to about $11 million for individuals and about $22 million for couples) for six years and then repeal the estate tax after 2024. This is significant for nonprofits because charitable donations and bequests are exempt from the estate tax. A higher exemption will mean that fewer estates will make large bequests to nonprofits (or create new foundations) for tax purposes. New research suggests that the elimination of the estate tax would reduce charitable bequests by $4 billion per year.

2. Universal Charitable Deduction Gains Bipartisan Support in Senate
This week, U.S. Senators from both major political parties followed the lead of Representative Mark Walker (R-NC) in pushing for the addition of a universal, non-itemizer deduction for charitable contributions to the tax plan or by passing separate legislation. Last month, Representative Walker introduced the Universal Charitable Giving Act (H.R. 3988), which we strongly support. This week, Senator James Lankford (R-OK) introduced an identical bill (S.2123) in the U.S. Senate, and Senators Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) and Ron Wyden (D-OR) introduced an amendment to the Senate tax reform bill that also would create a universal charitable deduction. The Democratic amendment was voted down along party lines like all other amendments offered in the Senate Finance Committee.

A new report from the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center highlights the need for a universal charitable deduction as part of tax reform. The Tax Policy Center analysis found that the House and Senate tax reform plans would mean that nonprofits would lose between $12 billion and $20 billion in contributions every year. An earlier conservative analysis from Indiana University estimated that the tax bills would reduce giving to the work of charitable nonprofits by $13 billion each year.

3. U.S. Senate Finance Committee Approves Its Tax Reform Plan
Last night, the U.S. Senate Finance Committee approved its own tax reform plan, also known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, after a multi-day markup. Although it differs greatly from the House version, the Senate plan would also make many changes to tax laws affecting nonprofits. Most notably, the Senate version would have the same impact on charitable giving as the House plan, but makes no changes to the Johnson Amendment and preserves private activity bonds. Other key changes for nonprofits in the Senate tax reform package include:
a• Punishing nonprofits that are the victims of excess benefit transactions by imposing a 10% excise tax on nonprofits in some instances when a disqualified person (e.g. a board member or nonprofit executive) receives an excess benefit transaction. Under current law, these penalties are only imposed on the disqualified person and/or on board members who approved of the transaction. The changes would penalize the people served by nonprofits by imposing an excise tax on nonprofit organizations rather than just on the individuals who received excess benefits.
b• Replacing the "rebuttable presumption of reasonableness" with "due diligence procedures", which may make it harder for nonprofits to confidently rely on comparability data in setting executive compensation and establishing the appropriate valuation for transactions with board members. The Senate version also would eliminate a law that absolves nonprofit boards of liability for intermediate sanctions if they rely on professional advice and would apply intermediate sanctions rules to investment advisers and athletic coaches.
c• Treating income from licensing a nonprofit's name or logo as unrelated business income that is subject to unrelated business income tax (UBIT) and treating each business activity of a nonprofit separately for UBIT purposes, which could result in more UBIT liability for some nonprofits because there would be less opportunity to offset income with related expenses. Nonprofits would also pay a lower tax rate on UBIT, since the House plan would lower the maximum corporate income tax rate from 35% to 20%.
d• Doubling the exemption from the estate tax (to about $11 million for individuals and about $22 million for couples), but not repealing the estate tax.
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